Memory and Desire a Carlo Gébler “2016 Favourite Book”

In the annual Irish Times feature where Irish writers nominate their “Favourite Books of 2016“, Irish author Carlo Gébler described the work as “scrupulous, quiet, unpretentious. In this mad world we need more literature in this register.”

 

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Anne Enright reviews “Memory and Desire”

 

In this splendid review, Anne Enright discusses the historic context of Memory and Desire:  “It is remarkable how these stories, published between 1978 and 1988, consistently point to things we pretended, in those days, not to know.”  For the live link, click here.  Scroll down for full text. 

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Val Mulkerns was a presence on the bookshelves of my childhood home. Her short stories in particular were read with the odd interest we bring to the work of someone close to us.

Click here to read the full text of the review now

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Memory and Desire In Irish Times

 

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Launch of  Memory and Desire at The Irish Writers’ Centre

 

Hard to believe that Val Mulkerns published her first novel in 1951 and that  this is her tenth title, sixty-five years later.  In between came two more novels, three short story collections, two children’s books and many thousands of words of journalistic work, as she became a columnist for a national newspaper in the seventies.

val-reads-at-launchStanding at the podium in The Irish Writers’ Centre on Thursday night, she read an extract from the first story in the collection, “Special Category”, inspired by her father, Jimmy Mulkerns, who had been imprisoned in Frongoch prison camp (via Knutsford Jail) in 1916 following his participation in the Battle of the Four Courts.

As the kick-start to Memory and Desire” it certainly pulls the reader in.  Stories then follow in chronological fashion, actually drawing a rough line through most of Ireland in the twentieth century – from the birth of the nation through its massive changes in the sixties and seventies and then into the late eighties: an Ireland struggling between the disillusion of recession and emergence into a post-colonial identity.

ronan-introduces-at-launchAmong the guests at the launch of “Memory and Desire” were authors Sebastian Barry, June Considine, Seán O’Reilly, Mia Gallagher and Susan Lanigan.  Others from the literary, publishing and press circles included Jonathan Williams, Vincent Browne, Micheal O’Brien and Svetlana Peronko.

The evening was a splendid success, with Professor Ronan Conroy of RCSI delivering the best of introductions:  smart, witty and full of warmth.

Memory and Desire, the new title from Val Mulkerns, is to be launched on Mem-Des-end-email imageThursday, 12 May 2016 at 6:30pm in the Irish Writers’ Centre, in Dublin.

The stories, edited chronologically, start in 1916 with a tale based on the author’s own father, imprisoned following his participation in the battle of the Four Courts.  Other stories take us through hard times in Dublin of the nineteen-thirties and forties and into the changing Ireland of the sixties and seventies. The final, title story, ‘Memory and Desire’, is a quintessential eighties tale that author Colm Tóibín has described as: “one of the finest short stories that has been published in Ireland for many years”.

The author is available for readings and media opportunities, and any inquiry can be directed to Cormac Kinsella, at on 01-634-9924 or ckinsella@repforce.ie.
More can also be seen at:  www.451Editions.com

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Sun-Misc2-sm-4-list sun-misc3Val Mulkerns to appear on Easter’s “Sunday Miscellany”

 

No stranger to the long-standing RTE programme, “Sunday Miscellany“, having read many times down the years on the popular Sunday morning show, Val Mulkerns read a new piece related to the 1916-2016 commemorations on the show for the Easter 2016 weekend.

The author is the daughter of JJ Mulkerns, a man who fought with the Easter rebels in the GPO, but who was also a railwayman, a strolling player and the writer of satirical songs.  A tall, copper-haired man with a striking voice, he was arrested during the Rising and eventually interned in the notorious Frongoch prison camp, a former whiskey factory in Northern Wales.

For the Sunday Miscellany broadcast on Easter Monday, Val Mulkerns joined other writers and musicians who read and performed songs of the period.  Artists included the RTE Contempo Quartet, tenor Morgan Crowley and Iarla O’Lionáird.

The-Rajah-Portrait-500px-facing-leftJJ, also known as Jimmy Mulkerns, was nicknamed “The Rajah of Frongoch” by fellow-prisoners because of his flamboyant role as MC at the camp’s music-hall style presentations each Friday evening, when the men would sing, present dramas and play traditional music.

For more on this, see the article about the author’s visit to Frongoch last December, 2015, written by Maev Kennedy in the Guardian.

To hear the actual broadcast of the essay, read by Val Mulkerns live at the Wexford Opera House, please click this link.

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Frongoch prison camp, 1916